Prepositions: "From", "Away" (Places)


FROM de, desde
Indica lugar, tiempo o circunstancia. Se usa para expresar:
a.) Procedencia, origen:
I'm from Spain / Soy español
b.) Separación
Take the scissors from the child / Quítale las tijeras al niño
c.) Causa
He did it from spite / Lo hizo por despecho
d.) Relación de tiempo:
I study from morning till night / Estudio desde la mañana hasta la noche
From 20 July / Desde el 20 de julio

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The common preposition from can be used with verbs
that show movement and with verbs that do not. When
it is used with "movement verbs," it shows the place
that someone / something left--or, to say this in another
way, it shows the starting point of the movement
(while to shows the destination or result):
B
(destination)


<==========

A
(starting point)

Joe walked / ran / drove / flew / walked (etc.)
from A to B.




B
(starting point)


==========>

A
(destination)

Joe walked / ran / drove / flew / walked (etc.)
from B to A.

The two-word preposition away from is basically
the same as from, but puts a stronger emphasis on
leaving the starting point.


From is also used with certain "non-movement verbs"
in two very common phrases--be from and come
from. These two phrases are generally used to show
someone's origin. If be from or come from are
followed by a country, it is understood to be someone's
native country / country of citizenship. If be from or
come from are followed by a city, it is understood to
be someone's home town.


    • Nadia is from / comes from Tunisia.
    • (Nadia is a native of / a citizen of Tunisia.)Ricardo is from / comes from
    • Recife, Brazil. (Ricardo is a native of /
    • a citizen of Brazil; his home town is Recife.)Where is Przemyslaw from?
    • (What is Przemyslaw's native country /
    • country of citizenship?)Where does Przemyslaw come from?
    • (What is Przemyslaw's native country /
    • country of citizenship?)
When native speakers of English use be from or
come from to refer to someone who was born in their
own country, the place after be from or come from
is normally someone's home city, state, province, etc.:

    • Mr. Ferguson is from / comes from
    • Chicago. (Mr. Ferguson's home town
    • is Chicago.)I'm from / I come from Illinois, but
    • I live in Arizona now. (Illinois is my
    • home state, but I live in Arizona now.)Jean-Luc is from / comes from
    • Quebec. (Jean-Luc's home province
    • is Quebec.)

Special Note:
Both be from and come from are in simple present
tense when they show someone's origin. If come from
is used in a past tense to refer to someone who is alive,
it shows the starting point for a trip, not someone's
country (etc.) of origin or home city, state, etc.:
    • Mr. Ferguson comes from Chicago.
    • (Chicago is Mr. Ferguson's home city.)Mr. Ferguson came from Chicago.
    • (Chicago was Mr. Ferguson's starting point
    • for a trip.)
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ACTIVITY


Preposition 'From' - Phrasal Verb Quiz